Destination

Tourist Destinations in Northeast

Northeast India (officially North Eastern RegionNER) is the easternmost region of India representing both a geographic and political administrative division of the country. It comprises eight states – Arunachal PradeshAssamManipurMeghalayaMizoramNagalandSikkim, and Tripura. The Siliguri Corridor in West Bengal, with a width of 21 to 40 kilometres (13 to 25 mi),connects the North Eastern Region with East India. The region shares an international border of 5,182 kilometres (3,220 mi) (about 99 percent of its total geographical boundary) with the neighbouring countries – 1,395 kilometres (867 mi) with Tibet Autonomous Region, China in the north, 1,640 kilometres (1,020 mi) with Myanmar in the east, 1,596 kilometres (992 mi) with Bangladesh in the south-west, 97 kilometres (60 mi) with Nepal in the west and 455 kilometres (283 mi) with Bhutan in the north-west.It comprises an area of 262,230 square kilometres (101,250 sq mi), almost 8 percent of that of India, and is one of the largest salients (panhandles) in the world.

Kaziranga National Park

Kaziranga National Park is a protected area in the northeast Indian state of Assam. Spread across the floodplains of the Brahmaputra River, its forests, wetlands and grasslands are home to tigers, elephants and the world’s largest population of Indian one-horned rhinoceroses. Ganges River dolphins swim in the park’s waters. It’s visited by many rare migratory birds, and gray pelicans roost near Kaziranga village.

Tawang

If Shangri-La conjures up images of an earthly paradise isolated from the outside world, happy people, Buddhist chants floating in the air, and mystical monks engrossed in prayers, then Tawang is what you’re most likely thinking about. Located at a height of near about 10,000 ft above sea level, picturesque Tawang is a thinly populated mountainous tract lying on the northwest extremity of Arunachal Pradesh in north east India. It is also the seat of the 400-year-old Tawang monastery, one of the oldest and the largest monasteries in India and the biggest outside of Lhasa.

Cherrapunji

High above misty valleys and foaming rivers, ensconced in swirling clouds and perched on an escarpment, lies Cherrapunji (4,500 feet). This is a stunning location and the year-round rain earned Cherrapunji coveted entry long ago into the Guinness Book of World Records as the wettest place on earth, the place where the rainfall can be recorded in feet rather than in millimeters.

Shillong

Shillong, the capital of medhalaya, has been one of the most popular tourist destinations in the northeast india. It is situated at an attitude of 1,520 meters (4,990 feet) above sea level. It is situated on a plateau bound on the north by the Umiam gorge, on the northwest by the great mass of the Diengiei Hills that rise up to a height of 1,823 meters (6077 ft.) above sea level, and on the northeast by the hills of the Assam valley.It is also known as the "Scotland of the East" due to its striking similarity with the Scottish highlands. It is located at distance of 104 km from Guwahati, 295 km from Kaziranga, 578 km from Siliguri and 658 km from Darjeeling.

Tura

Located in the West Garo hills, Tura provides a spellbinding as well as serene environment being quite an unexplored town.This relatively large town in Meghalaya is located in the West Garo Hills. The main attraction of this town is the Nokrek National Park which is 12km from the town where various animals such as the leopard, golden cat, wild buffalo, pheasant and many more find habitat. One may also visit the Rongbang Dar Falls, while a trip to this area, without visiting the Siju caves, would remain somewhat incomplete. The entire area has the simple nature of an unexplored destination, with a shifted world.

Agartala

Agartala is the capital city of Tripura, a northeast Indian state. The huge, white Ujjayanta Palace, built in 1901 by Maharaja Radha Kishore Manikya, has Mughal-style gardens with fountains. It houses the Tripura Government Museum, where displays include 9th-century sculptures. Nearby, ornate columns and pointed domes mark the Hindu temple Jagannath Bari. North, Rabindra Kanan park has flowerbeds and a puppet house.

Guwahati

Guwahati is a sprawling city beside the Brahmaputra River in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It’s known for holy sites like the hilltop Kamakhya Temple, featuring shrines to the Hindu deities Shiva and Vishnu. To the east, 18th-century Navagraha Temple is an astronomical center with planetary shrines. Umananda Temple, dedicated to Shiva and coveredwith engravings, stands on Peacock Island in the river.Near the large Digholi Pukhuri pond, the Assam State Museum displays sculptures, textiles and regional coins. Close by, the Guwahati Planetarium offers stargazing and light shows. In the east of the city, the Assam State Zoo Cum Botanical Garden is a vast, leafy space that's home to an orchid house and rare animals such as white tigers and one-horned rhinos. 

Kohima

Kohima is the hilly capital city of India's north eastern state of Nagaland. With a resident population of 99,039 it is the second largest city in the state. Originally known as Kewhira, it was founded in 1878 when the British Empire established its headquarters of the then Naga Hills. It officially became the capital after the state of Nagaland was inaugurated in 1963. Kohima is the land of the Angami Naga tribe. It is situated in the foothills of Japfu range located south of Kohima District and has an average elevation of 1261 metres.

Sivasagar

Sivasagar, previously spelled Sibsagar, is a city in the Sivasagar District of Assam, about 360 kilometres northeast of Guwahati. It is the headquarters of the Sivasagar district. This city is surrounded by the Dehing rainforest, where the Dihing and Lohit rivers meet. Sivasagar was earlier known as kids point.